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Drugs and substances

Drug dealing brings crime and violence to otherwise peaceful communities, and makes people feel helpless and afraid in their own homes and towns. Drug taking causes young people to drop out of school, and it makes parents lose interest in their children. It pushes people into lives of crime and poverty, destroys ambition and ruins lives.

We work with the police and our other partners to limit the damage drugs do. We aim to;

Misuse of Drugs Act

This is the main piece of legislation covering drugs and categorises drugs as class A, B and C.

These drugs are termed as controlled substances, and Class A drugs are those considered to be the most harmful.

Offences under the Act include;

To enforce this law the police have special powers to stop, detain and search people on 'reasonable suspicion' that they are in possession of a controlled drug.


Classification under the Act

Class A drugs

Include: Ecstasy, LSD, heroin, cocaine, crack, magic mushrooms (whether prepared or fresh), methyl amphetamine (crystal meth), other amphetamines if prepared for injection.

Penalties for possession: Up to seven years in prison or an unlimited fine. Or both.

Penalties for dealing: Up to life in prison or an unlimited fine. Or both.


Class B drugs

Include: Cannabis, amphetamines, Methylphenidate (Ritalin), Pholcodine.

Penalties for possession: Up to five years in prison or an unlimited fine. Or both.

Penalties for dealing: Up to 14 years in prison or an unlimited fine. Or both.


Class C drugs

Include: Tranquilisers, some painkillers, GHB (Gamma hydroxybutyrate), ketamine.

Penalties for possession: Up to two years in prison or an unlimited fine. Or both.

Penalties for dealing: Up to 14 years in prison or an unlimited fine. Or both.

The Police can apply for intervention orders when drug abuse leads to anti-social activities.

Police powers allow police to apply for orders forcing drug addicts known for their anti-social behaviour to get free drug treatment.

Police can apply for intervention orders whenever they believe that drug abuse is contributing to a person's anti-social activities, such as aggressive begging, or playing music or televisions consistently loudly, and intimidating neighbours and passers-by.

Where drug dealing is causing anti-social behaviour at a particular property or premises then a would be sought.

Information about the safe disposal of syringes and needles can be found at .

What you can do

If you are experiencing problems with anti-social behaviour, or have any concerns about it, or other community safety issues, please do not hesitate to contact us.

A great information web site for younger people can be found at Fearless.

Feel free to use the diary sheet below to record your incident and then, please contact us. You may find the guidance leaflet useful or you could visit the Incident Diary page for more information.

Related documents

Size Name
[154kb] Anti-social incident diary Anti-social incident diary
[1018kb] Incident Diary Booklet Guidance Incident Diary Booklet Guidance

The documents in this section are in Adobe Acrobat format (pdf). You will need Acrobat Reader to view these files which can be downloaded from the Adobe website free of charge.